LISTEN: The White Stripes' final concert released digitally

music news 21/09/2019

The White Stripes officially called it quits just over eight years ago, but the band actually took to the stage for the final time four years prior in 2007. Audio footage from that last concert in Mississipi has finally made its way online after all these years.

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The now-historic show went down on July 31st in Snowden Grove, near the border between Mississippi and Tennessee. Jack and Meg White managed to tear through a total of 24 songs over the course of a few hours, ending the evening - and ultimately their live performance history - with Leadbelly's traditional blues song 'Boll Weevil'.

The majority of people weren't aware that the set would be The White Stripes' last one ever, with Third Man Records' Ben Blackwell, who also serves as an archivist for The White Stripes, finding out only minutes before they hit the stage that evening.

Recalling that night, Blackwell said: "Meg said to me, 'I think this is the last White Stripes show.' Confused, I responded 'Well, yeah, last show of this leg of the tour.' She replied 'No… I think this is the last White Stripes show ever,' and slowly walked away."

"I was dumbfounded. I had no idea what she was talking about. I had no idea what she meant. I had no idea what to do. I looked around to see if anyone else heard what Meg had said, but I was all alone."

Blackwell then quickly moved to grab whatever documents and memorabilia he could, making sure to scribble down the setlist and take note of particular moments throughout the concert.

I can’t believe how long it has taken us to get here," White told the crowd, according to Blackwell. "Thanks for waiting. Thanks for coming. Thanks for buying our records. Thanks for buying a ticket. We love you very much. Thank you. God bless you, Son House. God bless you, Robert Johnson. Thank you so much."

"After re-listening to this show for the first time in ages, I feel like only now have I fully absorbed the enormity of that line," Blackwell wrote. "Frankly, it just hit me like a freight train to the chest. I was caught entirely off-guard. I couldn’t help but be moved to tears."